Maladative daydreaming

14 January 2014 - 1:58

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Does anyone here have any experience with Maladative daydreaming and ocd? Been reading a few forums and websites and im pretty sure I have this, most of the experiences I read were ocd related.

K.

14 January 2014 - 12:47

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Hi WalkAroundInCircles

Interesting never heard of that one before but the more I read about it and the relationship between that and ocd is something. When I was reading an article about maladative daydreaming it mentioned about people who might shake certain objects to sort of encourage the daydream. I used to shake objects in the past such as coat hangers and toys sitting around the house. I still have that tendency to pick up objects and start shaking them I know it sounds crazy but it helped with the daydreaming.

There's a film coming out called (The Secret Life of Walter Mitty) This is based on a book by James Thurber. Walter Mitty has some imagination that sometimes when he is in the office he starts to day dream affecting many areas of his life.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0359950/

14 January 2014 - 16:43

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WalkAroundinCircles

Thank you very much for starting this thread. I hadn't come across this concept before but fortunately there are some references to it with open access on the web including a very few academic articles. My OCD started in childhood and was accompanied by 'maladaptive daydreaming'. The daydreaming was accompanied by the rocking movement described as one of the outward manifestations of this type of imaginative thinking and in my case was associated with experiencing abuse. I notice that when several years ago orphans in a Eastern European country were filmed very many children were engaged in rocking movements and I thought that they were entering a fantasy realm in their heads. At times I think far from being 'maladaptive' the imaginative leaps of fantasy provide a temporary mental escape route into another realm. But the longer term consequences of this form of adaptation to a set of environmental circumstances in the longer term are undoubtedly malaadaptive.

15 January 2014 - 18:28

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Thanks for the replys, there is sparse info on the net about this. What I do find is usually very informative. This fit the pacing I do very well and the fact I almost always listen to music while pacing. Ill be doing some more research and posting back. Keep up the replys.

K.M

19 January 2014 - 17:32

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Hi

I spent a little time reading articles about 'mental imagery' and it appears that research evidence in the field of mental health is quite sparse. CBT therapy is essentially verbal yet our visual powers are quite strong. For example the mental maps we have of our house and neighbourhood. The recurrent imagery in post traumatic stress syndrome. The relation of memory to mental imagery is a strong focus of recent research. There are some positive features to daydreaming as is the case of OCD and hoarding problems are defined as clinically problematic only when daydreaming or whatever takes up too much time ir seriously interferes with living a normal life. There even seems to be lacking a recognised system for classifying types of image. I hope I am mistaken but the whole subject is in its infancy. I hope somebody can dispute this. But I have seen no questions relating to images in the case of OCD therapy.

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